"A comprehensive catalogue of various aspects of British society during the Second World War"

- Dr David Clampin, Liverpool John Moores University

War, State and Society provides access to thousands of documents from the collections of eleven U.K. government departments, each responsible for dealing with and reporting on the domestic situation in Britain during the Second World War and its aftermath. Sourced from The National Archives (U.K.) and the History of Advertising Trust, its files provide a uniquely comprehensive insight into the social, economic, political and cultural affairs of wartime Britain, and a valuable snapshot of day-to-day life in every corner of the country and beyond.

This new digital collection allows students and researchers to examine multiple themes and topics from this pivotal moment of social history, and to interrogate the wider impact of modern warfare on civilian populations. It provides access to a wide range of documents, from social surveys and statistical analyses to food offences trials, propaganda film scripts, and wartime advertising, as well as a diverse array of voices from the very top of government to the narratives and testimonies of ordinary citizens.

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The sheer volume of material available here deserves recognition: this is not a partial nor selective view, but rather a comprehensive catalogue of various aspects of British society during the Second World War.

 There’s a wealth of rich local history here. This is a superb resource which will enhance our research into this fascinating period of British history.

War, State and Society is an exceptional resource which allows students and researchers alike to dive deeply into virtually all aspects of the British home front in the Second World War. From the public and official face of the war to the rumours which spread like fire, from the individual experiences of civilians under aerial bombardment to government effort to manage a total war economy — it’s all here.

This resource will allow students to delve into the material and draw their own conclusions, rather than relying on a partial view or the interpretation of others.

Readers can study a report on the Bethnal Green tragedy, see the transcript for the classic Humphrey Jennings’ film Listen to Britain (1942), look at a report on Rudolf Hess’ landing in Scotland, examine the shelter census or delve into The Land Girl magazine.

David Clampin

Liverpool John Moores University

Juliette Pattinson

University of Kent

Brett Holman

University of New England (Australia)

David Clampin

Liverpool John Moores University

Juliette Pattinson

University of Kent

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